Abstract


UNRAVELLING THE MASSIVE BIODIVERSITY AND FUNCTIONAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF MICROBIAL BIOFILMS IN STREAM NETWORKS

Biofilms dominate microbial life in streams where they control key ecosystem processes and biogeochemical fluxes. Over the last few years, next generation sequencing has unveiled the massive microbial diversity benthic biofilms harbour. We will expand on these exciting findings showing how patterns of alpha and beta diversity of biofilms are distributed throughout alpine stream networks. Furthermore, using co-occurrence network analyses, we present evidence that metacommunity dynamics and the hydrological regime differently influence community organisation in the smallest headwaters compared to larger downstream ecosystems. To further understand the functioning of complex biofilm communities in streams, we combined BrdU-incorporation assays, metagenome reconstruction, and experimental amendments with allochthonous and autochthonous dissolved organic matter as these sources change along altitudinal gradients. We found shifts in specialisation and multifunctional redundancy in biofilm communities moving downstream from above to below the treeline in Alpine streams. These results are relevant because they link microbial functional traits and resource use to climate change, which is predicted to shift microbial communities and terrestrial vegetation with implications for terrestrial deliveries of organic carbon into alpine streams.

Authors

Battin, T. J., EPFL, Switzerland, tom.battin@univie.ac.at

Besemer, K., University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Wilhelm, L., University of Vienna, Austria

Singer, G., IGB , Germany

Peter, H., University of Innsbruck, Austria

Widder, S., University of Vienna, Austria

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:116
Date: 2/24/2015
Time: 17:00
Location: Room C (Floor -3)

Presentation is given by student: No