Abstract


ACTIVE REEF RESTORATION: IMPROVING THE OUTCOME FOR DEGRADED REEFS IN THAILAND

The threatened ecosystems of coral reefs are particularly vulnerable in those locations where anthropogenic pressures are acute. On the island of Koh Tao, in the Gulf of Thailand scuba diving and coral reef related tourism places ever increasing pressure on the fragile reefs that surround this 21km2 island. Conservation groups in collaboration with local businesses, universities, scientists, government officials and community groups implement a range of reef restoration tools and activities that aim to increase the resilience of the reefs around the island. Using coral and giant clam nurseries, artificial reefs and a suite of monitoring tools conservation has developed into a mainstay of the economic model of this scuba diving dependent location. Developing artificial reefs combined with active reef restoration has released pressure from vulnerable natural reefs. These artificial locations allow opportunities for novel and innovative reef restoration techniques while providing welcome respite for overexploited reef environments. We explore the potential for truly community based tourism and conservation groups to develop these multi faceted targeted artificial reefs to ecologically support the recovery of natural reefs in this heavily perturbed environment.

Author

Cook, N., Eco Koh Tao Marine Conservation Orgisation/ Souhtern Cross University , Thailand, nath@ecokohtao.com

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:42B
Date: 06/23/2016
Time: 13:45
Location: 301 B

Presentation is given by student: Yes