Abstract


ASSISTED RECOVERY OF DEGRADED REEFS: CORAL RESTORATION WITHOUT THE NEED FOR TRANSPLANTATION

Current reef rehabilitation practices involving coral transplantation are labor and cost intensive since each individual must be reared to a suitable size and transplanted manually. These constraints have limited the scale of most restoration efforts to less than a hectare, while reef degradation occurs on scales of 10's to 1000's of km2. We introduce a new concept to seed larger areas of reef with sexually reared coral juveniles bypassing the need for transplantation. Following the concept of a farmer bedding out seedlings on a field, sexual coral propagules settled on engineered substrates (=SExual COral REproduction Seeding Unit, SECORE SU) and reared in a nursery for a short time period are introduced to the reef by wedging them in reef crevices without the use of any adhesives. This concept was initially tested in Curacao with the brooding coral Favia fragum using tetrapod-like shaped cement substrates. Three weeks after larval settlement and after an intermediate ex-situ hatching period, SUs were introduced to reef areas of varying structural complexity. Substrate stabilization, recruit survival and SU performance were monitored for 1 year. After 1 year, 70-81% of the tetrapods were recovered across all reef complexity levels, of which 71-94% stabilized on the reef. In total 55-57% of the tetrapods that were originally seeded to the reef still harbored ≥1 recruit (SU performance). The results of this initial study indicate seeding SUs without the need for transplantation offers great potential to increase the scale of reef restoration efforts. Case studies carried out in Mexico, Guam and Singapore further highlight possibilities and limitations of this new concept.

Authors

Petersen, D., SECORE International, Germany, d.peteren@secore.org

Chamberland, V., SECORE International / Carmabi Foundation / University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Antilles, chamberland.f.valerie@gmail.com

Vermeij, M., Carmabi Foundation / University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Antilles, carmabilog@gmail.com

Banaszak, A., Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia (ICML), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico, banaszak@cmarl.unam.mx

Raymundo, L., Marine Laboratory, University of Guam, USA, ljraymundo@gmail.com

Petersen, U., University of Applied Sciences Kempten, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Germany, udo.petersen@hs-kempten.de

Brittsan, M., SECORE International / Columbus Zoo and Aquarium , USA, Mike.Brittsan@columbuszoo.org

Guest, J., SECORE International, Malaysia, jrguest@gmail.com

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:42B
Date: 06/23/2016
Time: 14:00
Location: 301 B

Presentation is given by student: No