Abstract


SLIM, A HIGH-RESOLUTION MULTI-PURPOSE DISPERSAL MODELING TOOL FOR THE GREAT BARRIER REEF

High-resolution ocean circulation models are required to simulate the complex and multi-scale currents that drive physical connectivity between marine ecosystems. However, standard coastal ocean models rarely achieve a spatial resolution of less than 1km over the >100km spatial scale of dispersion processes. Here we use the high-resolution unstructured-mesh coastal ocean model SLIM that locally achieves a spatial resolution of ~100m over the scale of the entire Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Using such a high-resolution model allows us to simulate the classical cascade from large-scale to small-scales, but also a feedback from the small-scale to the large-scale. By coupling SLIM with a biophysical model of larval dispersal we can track the position of virtual larvae or propagules released into the simulated domain. Connectivity matrices are then generated from the positions of the particles at the start and at the end of the simulations. Useful information can be extracted from these large matrices by using graph theory tools such as community detection, page rank, influence rank and HITS algorithms. These methods are illustrated for different applications including connectivity between submerged and near-sea-surface coral reefs, dispersion of seagrass propagules and crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks. Our study suggests that combining a high-resolution ocean model with novel graph theory algorithms is a powerful tool for studying physical connectivity between marine ecosystems and informing management decisions.

Authors

Hanert, E., UCLouvain, Belgium, emmanuel.hanert@uclouvain.be

Thomas, C. J., UCLouvain, Belgium

Wolter, J., UCLouvain, Belgium

Grech, A., Macquarie University, Australia

Bridge, T. C., James Cook University, Australia

Figueiredo, J., Nove Southeastern University, USA

Coles, R., James Cook University, Australia

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:50
Date: 06/23/2016
Time: 15:15
Location: 312

Presentation is given by student: No