Abstract


‘REEF RECOVERY PLANS’ FOR THE GREAT BARRIER REEF MARINE PARK- MANAGING LOCAL PRESSURES IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

The Great Barrier Reef is in decline and the outlook for the ecosystem has been assessed as 'poor'. These declines are driven by a range of pressures, primarily climate change, degraded water quality, coastal development and some fishing activities. These pressures operate at a range of scales from global to local. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is working with industries and communities to develop 'Reef Recovery Plans' to address local pressures at a local scale. These plans are intended to complement the catchment-based 'Water Quality Improvement Plans' to deliver a holistic catchment to Reef approach to local scale problems. The local pressures to be addressed include crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks, localised unsustainable fishing, anchor damage, and marine debris. There is also a focus on protection and restoration of coastal ecosystems that support healthy marine environments. Reef Recovery Plans will include a mixture of regulatory mechanisms (such as Marine Protected Areas and fisheries management), and a voluntary, co-operative stewardship approach. This approach necessitates active partnership between Traditional Owners, government (at all levels), industry (especially tourism, fishing, and ports), and the community (recreational users, conservation). We expect that effectively addressing catchment and marine pressures at the local scale will help maintain the resilience of the ecosystem in the face of global pressures.

Author

Wachenfeld, D. R., Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Australia, david.wachenfeld@gbrmpa.gov.au

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:65
Date: 06/23/2016
Time: 15:00
Location: 305 A/B

Presentation is given by student: No