Abstract


DESIGNING FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AREAS FOR PATE ISLAND, LAMU ARCHIPELAGO, KENYA

Fisheries resources in Kenya are facing increasing threats from overfishing and habitat destruction resulting from weak governance system and increasing demand for fisheries resources. The situation is exacerbated by impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. One key to containing these threats could be fisheries co-management approaches that have been widely adopted internationally in response to the widespread degradation of fisheries resources. Fishing is an important source of livelihood and food security along the Kenyan coast and especially in the northern coast of Lamu. The Kenyan government has provided frameworks within which natural resources including fisheries can be co-managed more sustainably and effectively. In compliance, the fisheries Beach Management Units in Pate Island initiated the process of developing co-management plans for their respective areas. A series of community-led marine managed area planning processes were held since 2014 characterized by robust stakeholders consultations and capacity building sessions. These included input from latest science that helped inform decisions by fishers to ensure proposed rules/zones achieve desired community benefits. Six different zones were proposed including a multi-use zone, no-take zone, species-specific zone, seasonal closure and gear restriction zone. This paper shares experiences from Pate Island where local communities and partners are taking advantage of the new innovative co-management structures and latest science to design effective fisheries co-management areas.

Author

Maina, G. W., The Nature Conservancy, Africa Regional Office. P.O. Box 19738-00100, Nairobi,, Kenya, gwmaina@tnc.org

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:71
Date: 06/23/2016
Time: 15:15
Location: 302 A/B

Presentation is given by student: No