Abstract


REPLACING BARBIE’S NOTEBOOK: HOW DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY IS REVOLUTIONIZING DATA COLLECTION IN SMALL SCALE FISHERIES

The collection of fisheries data from small scale fisheries has historically been a challenge for national governments. The technical and financial investment required to sustain data collection across scores of communities whose fishers target complex multispecies fisheries, often with a low catch value has not been an obvious priority when allocating limited national budgets. In the last few years however the advent of low cost cloud computing and the widespread adoption of smart phones in rural areas means that the technology exists to revolutionize data collection and vastly improve the ability and cost effectiveness of collecting, analyzing and disseminating fisheries information at national scales. Here, I present case studies from both the Caribbean and South East Asia where a simple to use data collection system built around a mobile App, a solar powered vessel monitoring device and a digital registration system, have been deployed across large geographic areas to capture high resolution data on a range of small scale fisheries. I explore the challenges presented by moving record keeping from note books to the cloud, the need for careful design in technology to overcome barriers in literacy and language, and the development of data management pipelines and automated systems to collate, analyze, interpret and disseminate data in near real time. The approach is rapidly increasing our understanding of how fishers use the seascape and coral reef resources, empowering decision makers at all levels and enabling science to underpin small scale fisheries management.

Author

Box, S. J., Smithsonian Institution, USA, boxs@si.edu

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:71
Date: 06/23/2016
Time: 14:30
Location: 302 A/B

Presentation is given by student: No