Abstract


GEOTHERMAL STREAM ECOSYSTEMS AS SENTINELS FOR CLIMATE WARMING IN LOTIC ECOSYSTEMS

Freshwater ecosystems are known to be vulnerable to global warming, with many freshwater organisms threatened due to limited dispersal abilities. This vulnerability makes freshwater ecosystems perhaps a perfect sentinel for climate warming, where it is possible to incorporate environmental changes at different spatiotemporal scales. In this study we focused on the possible effect of warming on stream community structure and ecosystems functioning over a wide range of temperature regimes (3-43°C) of different discrete geothermal areas within Iceland. We used geothermally heated groundwater fed streams and groundwater fed streams with ambient temperature. The design of our comparative survey provide the opportunity to disentangle the relative effects of temperature and biogeographical isolation on community structure (primary producers, macroinvertebrates) and ecosystem functioning (standing biomass, whole stream metabolism, energy capture efficiency).

Authors

Olafsson, J. S., Institute of Freshwater Fisheries, Iceland, jsol@veidimal.is

Demars, B., James Hutton Inst., United Kingdom, Benoit.Demars@hutton.ac.uk

Gislason, G. M., University of Iceland, Iceland, gmg@hi.is

Magnusdottir, R. Þ., Institute of Freshwatr Fisheries, Iceland, ragna@veidimal.is

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:014
Date: 5/23/2014
Time: 10:45
Location: C 123 - 124

Presentation is given by student: No