Program and Agenda

Workshops and Town Halls

Listed in chronological order.

The Leaf Pack Experiment

Date: Saturday, May 17, 2014   Time: 9:00:00 AM
Location: Off-site

Organized By: Christina Medved

How can a clump of in-stream slimy leaves provide the basis for stream ecology exploration? Come and learn how to create leaf packs, a method used by scientists, to collect macroinvertebrates and examine the health of a stream. During this workshop participants will be given the most up-to-date information on streams within a watershed context based on research done at Stroud Water Research Center, followed by a game, and a hands-on examination of a leaf pack with live macroinvertebrates. With this unique tool, your students will be able to conduct their own experiments, investigate food webs, learn classification skills, and share data on the Leaf Pack Network® website. And, it all starts with an onion bag! For more information visit : http://www.stroudcenter.org/lpn/ . Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to leafpacknetwork@stroudcenter.org with your name school/organization affiliation, and phone number by May 2, 2014.

The Clean Water Act puzzle: where do wetland and aquatic resources science fit?

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 9:00:00 AM
Location: B 115

Organized By: Dawn Hamilton

What is the Clean Water Act (CWA)? What types of wetlands and aquatic resources are protected by the CWA, and how do these policies work? Can the role of science in policy be enhanced, and if so how? In this workshop, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lawyers and scientists will address these questions and many others, to provide aquatic scientists a working knowledge of the CWA, its strengths and weaknesses, and the relationship between freshwater science and CWA policy. Topics covered will include: statutory, regulatory, and judicial interpretations of the CWA (and what they mean), permitting and pollutant management under the CWA, CWA enforcement, and how science is (and can be) used to inform questions regarding CWA interpretation and implementation, such as “how clean is clean.” Advanced registration and fees required.

Presenters

Donna M. Downing is Jurisdiction Team Leader and an attorney in the U.S. EPA's Office of Water in Washington, D.C. She works on a variety of issues, with a recent focus on the geographic scope of the CWA in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's decisions in Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (SWANCC) and Rapanos v. United States (Rapanos). Much of her time is spent chairing the federal interagency staff workgroup for implementing SWANCC and Rapanos. Ms. Downing has been with EPA since 1998. She previously worked for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and in private law practice. She has a B.A. from Harvard University, an M.P.P. from the University of California, Berkeley, a J.D. from Georgetown University, and an L.L.M. in environmental law from George Washington University. Ms. Downing teaches as an adjunct professor at George Washington University Law School, and at EPA's Water Quality Standards Academy.

Rose Kwok is an Environmental Scientist in the U.S. EPA's Office of Water in Washington, D.C. She has worked for the wetlands program for almost nine years, where she focuses on Clean Water Act jurisdiction issues, including GIS mapping and support tools. She has a B.A. from Cornell University and a Master of Environmental Management from Duke University.
Laurie Alexander is a research ecologist in the U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development in Washington, D.C. Her current research is focused on landscape analysis of stream-wetland connectivity. She received her Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Maryland in 2007, where she studied the dispersal ecology and population genetics of mayflies in headwater streams. She has a B.A. from St. John’s College and an M.S. in Computer Science from The Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering. Before returning to graduate school to pursue a second career in entomology, Laurie was a software engineer with 18 years in radar avionics and satellite telecommunications systems design and development. She has been with the U.S. EPA since 2008.

Hadas Raanan Kiperwas is a post-doctoral ORISE Fellow with the U.S. EPA’s Office of Water in Washington, D.C. She works on science questions underlying Clean Water Act policies, and works towards developing knowledge and tools to better inform policy makers and enforcers. She has a B.Sc. in Geology from Ben Gurion University in Israel which she received summa cum laude, and a Ph.D. in Hydrology and Geochemistry from Duke University, where she studied the use of natural tracers to identify and quantify groundwater inputs into streams and lakes.

Beginner’s R for Analysis and Graphics

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 9:00:00 AM
Location: B 116

Organized By: Dawn Hamilton

This workshop will help those who are interested in using R for statistical analysis. It is intended for those who are just beginning or have limited exposure to R, but basic knowledge of statistics. R has many advantages over statistical software packages: it is freeware, it is commonly used by freshwater scientists, it is flexible, it has many highly qualified and specialized contributors, it allows repetitive analyses and graphic presentations, it is excellent documentation of analyses, and it is fun (aahh, the thrill of executing code without errors). However, without a patient mentor, R can be difficult to pick up. This workshop will get you started with formatting data, basic data structure, downloading libraries/packages, and running analyses that provide output for interim interpretation and for final presentation. We will begin with the fundamental building blocks of R: the data structure, language conventions, and program resources. Through hands-on exercises, we will be formatting and loading data, accessing and incorporating existing code, and writing small pieces of code for customized analyses and graphics. Complex statistical analyses will be attempted if the whole class is engaged and time allows. This is the third year that Ben Jessup and Lei Zheng have instructed R workshops at SFS.

Pre-Registration Required. Fee: Professional $120.00, Student $75.00

Presenters

Ben Jessup (benjamin.jessup@tetratech.com) Ben Jessup has been working with Tetra Tech for 16 years as an ecologist focusing on biomonitoring program support. Many of the routine statistical analyses for biomonitoring can be performed in R, including interpretation of stressor-response relationships, site classification, multimetric and predictive index development, indicator performance characterization, and criteria establishment. Because Mr. Jessup has recently converted to using R for statistical analyses and graphic displays, he is sympathetic to the frustrations of learning a new language. Mr. Jessup has facilitated training workshops on a variety of biomonitoring topics including biomonitoring basics, database applications, criteria development for biological and physical indicators, field protocols, and specific state and tribal index assessment issues.

Lei Zheng is a senior aquatic ecologist of Tetra Tech’s Center for Ecological Science. He has been an algal ecologist for 21 years and uses R daily in his statistical analyses. He has extensive experience working on biological monitoring and assessment, statistical modeling, and water quality standards/criteria for both marine and freshwater systems. He supports Nutrient-Scientific Technical Exchange Partnership and Support (N-STEPS) to help numerous states develop scientifically defensible nutrient criteria for lakes, streams, and estuaries. He is also actively involved in a number of high profile projects, such as BP oil spill analysis, mountain top coal mining/conductivity benchmark development in the Western Appalachian region, and Florida nutrient criteria development. Dr. Zheng was a firm fan of Systat® and SAS before 2003, but became a true believer and a loyal daily user of R since. He has been helping many others to use R for bioassessment related topics.

Identification of Ephemeroptera Larvae from Western North America, North of Mexico

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 9:00:00 AM
Location: B 113

Organized By: Dawn Hamilton

This workshop will provide resources and strategies to use when identifying mayfly larvae from the western United States and Canada, with some attention given also to extralimital species. We will suggest appropriate levels of taxonomic resolution for all groups. Current taxonomy of the western Nearctic fauna will be presented with discussion of recent changes, and we will look ahead to future directions of systematics research in all of North America.

Pre-registration required. Fee: Professional $120, Student $75

Presenter

Jeff Webb Ph.D has studied the systematics of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) for over 15 years and has published nearly 40 papers on the subject. He began his research into mayflies while an undergraduate student at the University of Saskatchewan and continued with mayfly taxonomy for his M.Sc. (University of Saskatchewan) and Ph.D. (Purdue University). Jeff spent three years at La Trobe University (Australia) as part of the Taxonomic Research Information Network revising the Baetidae of Australia using morphological and molecular methods. Following this, he returned to Canada for a postdoctoral fellowship at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario (University of Guelph) coordinating the DNA barcoding of the mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies of the world. He is currently a taxonomist with Rhithron Associates, Inc. in Montana.

Quantifying transient storage using OTIS

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 10:00:00 AM
Location: B 117 - 119

Organized By: Ron Runkel

Tracer techniques and solute transport models are frequently used to quantify the temporary detainment of solutes in hyporheic and surface storage zones. The physical process of "transient storage" has implications for nutrient cycling as the storage process affects residence time and the extent of biogeochemical processing. This 4-hour workshop provides an overview of OTIS (One-dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage), a solute transport model that is often used to quantify transient storage. The workshop will provide a step-by-step "how-to" on the use of OTIS to estimate transient storage parameters based on tracer data. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental concepts such as experimental design, data evaluation, transport processes, and parameter estimation (due to time constraints, "hands on" computer exercises will not be part of the workshop). Beginner and intermediate model users are encouraged to attend. Participants should read the OTIS documentation and have a conceptual understanding of transient storage prior to the workshop. The workshop will be presented by Rob Runkel, a Research Hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver Colorado. Attendees can register for the workshop by sending an email to Rob Runkel at runkel@usgs.gov.

Stream Resiliency Research Coordination Network

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 12:00:00 PM
Location: B 114

Organized By: Jay Jones (Jay.Jones@alaska.edu)

The workshop will be a planning meeting for the newly created Stream Resiliency Research Coordination Network. The Stream Resiliency Research Coordination Network was created for the scientific community and we are seeking network participation by researchers from a breadth of disciplines and career stages. Please join us for the afternoon workshop to learn about planned activities of the network, and how to become involved. We are actively seeking community involvement.

SFS INSTARS Mentoring Workshop Orientation (invitation only)

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 1:00:00 PM
Location: B 110 - 112

Organized By: Checo Colon-Gaud (jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu)

This is the fourth year that the Society for Freshwater Science (SFS) is sponsoring the INSTARS Mentoring Program for undergraduates from under-represented groups who are interested in the study of freshwaters. The program is open to students sponsored through INSTARS Fellowships and others from under-represented minorities. During the annual meeting opportunities for networking among graduate students, faculty and professionals will be promoted as we strive to encourage diversity in our discipline. This workshop is only open to INSTARS Fellows.

Tools and Techniques for Giving Compelling Talks

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 1:00:00 PM
Location: A 106

Organized By: Dennis Meredith

Drawing on research about how people perceive and process information, this workshop, given by Dennis Meredith, will give participants the tools and techniques they need to give compelling, informative talks to both lay and professional audiences. Topics covered will include understanding audiences' needs, the talk as a distinctive medium, using a "visual vernacular," designing effective slides, developing presentation skills, and how to obtain and create engaging visuals.

SFS Taxonomy Certification - EPT Image Testing

Date: Sunday, May 18, 2014   Time: 1:30:00 PM
Location: Off-site

Voluntary Validation Experiment--Taxonomic Certification Testing for Eastern Group 2 or Western Group 2 (eastern or western EPT) only. Volunteers must agree to attempt both an on-line, image-based exam and a microscopic, specimen-based exam. The image-based test will be administered on Sunday, May 18th from 1:30pm - 5:00pm, at the Portland University computer lab (7 miles from the Oregon Convention Center (OCC)). The specimen-based test will be administered on Monday, May 19th (either morning 8:30am-12:00pm or afternoon 12:30-4:00pm sessions) at the OCC. At the conclusion of the specimen-based exam, each volunteer will critique the two types of exam by responding to a short questionnaire. As incentives, volunteers will pay only $100 (half the usual registration fee) and can be certified by passing either the image-based exam or the specimen-based exam for the same group of genera (either Eastern Group 2 or Western Group 2).

  • Space is limited, so please register early.
  • Updates will appear here as further details are developed.
  • Candidates may also register for other Certification Groups (specimen based only- AM or PM) Monday, May19,2014.

Registration for the test is done through the TCP site: http://www.sfstcp.com/NABSTCPHome/UpcomingTests/tabid/94/Default.aspx

SFS Taxonomy Certification

Date: Monday, May 19, 2014   Time: 8:30:00 AM
Location: C 126

Voluntary Validation Experiment--Taxonomic Certification Testing for Eastern Group 2 or Western Group 2 (eastern or western EPT) only. Volunteers must agree to attempt both an on-line, image-based exam and a microscopic, specimen-based exam. The image-based test will be administered on Sunday, May 18th from 1:30pm - 5:00pm, at the Portland University computer lab (7 miles from the Oregon Convention Center (OCC)). The specimen-based test will be administered on Monday, May 19th (either morning 8:30am-12:00pm or afternoon 12:30-4:00pm sessions) at the OCC. At the conclusion of the specimen-based exam, each volunteer will critique the two types of exam by responding to a short questionnaire. As incentives, volunteers will pay only $100 (half the usual registration fee) and can be certified by passing either the image-based exam or the specimen-based exam for the same group of genera (either Eastern Group 2 or Western Group 2).

  • Space is limited, so please register early.
  • Updates will appear here as further details are developed.
  • Candidates may also register for other Certification Groups (specimen based only- AM or PM) Monday, May 19,2014.

Registration for the test is done through the TCP site: http://www.sfstcp.com/NABSTCPHome/UpcomingTests/tabid/94/Default.aspx

SWS PCP Information Session

Date: Monday, May 19, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 105

Organized By: Dhru Bhatt (dbhatt@association-resources.com)

Learn the ins and outs of the SWS Professional Certification Program and how certification may advance your professional career. This program is open to all JASM registrants and includes lunch. Pre-registration required.

Communicating with Policymakers 101

Date: Monday, May 19, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 106

Organized By: Adrienne Sponberg (asponberg@gmail.com)

Aquatic habitats are frequently at the center of significant policy debates. While most scientists are aware of these policy issues – and often frame their research to answer policy questions – few have formal training in policy making. Join ASLO Director of Public Affairs Adrienne Sponberg for a crash course on how U.S. federal policy is formulated and how scientists can provide input to policymakers.

Pitch Slam ! How to Pitch--and Land--Science News

Date: Monday, May 19, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: B 113

Organized By: Cheryl Lyn Dybas (Cheryl.Lyn.Dybas@gmail.com)

Bring news of your research and give it an audience! Participants in this workshop will learn how to present science in an interesting way while retaining factual accuracy--the key to good science communication and science journalism. Attendees will have the opportunity to engage in a "pitch slam," in which a jargon-free news or feature story idea is presented in one minute, then everyone joins in with feedback. Put engaging storytelling into science news! Opening remarks will be given by Debbie Bronk, NSF Acting Division Director for Ocean Sciences.Pitch “slammees” include Alan Tessier, NSF Acting Deputy Division Director for Environmental Biology.

NSF Town Hall

Date: Monday, May 19, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: B 114

Organized By: Debbie Bronk

A town hall to update the community on recent news from the National Science Foundation, organized by Deborah Bronk.

SWS PCP Information Session

Date: Monday, May 19, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 105

Organized By: Dhru Bhatt (dbhatt@association-resources.com)

Learn the ins and outs of the SWS Professional Certification Program and how certification may advance your professional career. This program is open to all JASM registrants and includes lunch. Pre-registration required.

Working Towards Interoperability Standards for Networks and Observatories

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: B 113

Organized By: Charlotte Roehm (croehm@neoninc.org)

Town Hall to discuss interoperability standards for projects, networks and observatories. Identify and define specific issues currently faced by the community, and identify gaps across the community that can be used as opportunities for further development and resource focus. Discuss the structure, scope and path forwards for the establishment of an Interoperability working group.

In an era of large scale, interdisciplinary science access to interoperable infrastructure and long-term data sets are integral in advancing science. Interoperability is the ability of two or more systems or components to exchange and use information. In order to provide and promote efficient access to and open sharing of data, a global framework is needed across freshwater, marine and other sciences. Interoperability is focused on three infrastructure components within a global scale system of systems: information infrastructure, physical infrastructure and support infrastructure. The components of interoperability include linking joint science questions to requirements, data quality and provenance traceability of measurements to known standards or best community practices, uncertainties in respective data products, and broadly defined informatics. The degree to which Networks and Observatories are interoperable is dependent on the degree to which these components are adopted. At a higher level, interoperability can contribute to better detailing of infrastructure interfaces, data systems, and workflows that describe instrument integration, their operation and observational databases. In this session, we welcome contributions that address approaches towards building interoperability frameworks that enhance the global access to data and integrate planned standards, and interfaces within and across networks and observatories.

SWS PCP Ethics Workshop #1

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 105

Organized By: Dhru Bhatt (dbhatt@association-resources.com)

Receive training on the ethical dilemmas that Professional Wetland Scientists, Consultants and Regulators face during this two-day training session held on Tuesday, May 20 and Wednesday, May 21 from 12:15 – 1:15pm. This workshop is open to all JASM registrants and includes lunch. Pre-registration required.

Science Communication: Delivering a Clear Message

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: D 135 - 136

Organized By: Heather Galindo (hgalindo@COMPASSonline.org)

In this one-hour workshop, you will learn how to talk about your science - and why it matters - in clear, lively terms. Using a tool called the Message Box, we’ll help you replace unnecessary details with an accurate message that will resonate with your audience and leave them wanting more. COMPASS has over a decade of experience helping scientists share their research with journalists, policymakers, and the wider world.

Aquatic Sciences Career Panel: One Degree, Many Paths

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 106

Organized By: Adrienne Sponberg (sponberg@aslo.org)

Adrienne Sponberg (sponberg@aslo.org) The scientific workforce is changing. New data indicate the majority of ecology and oceanography graduate degree holders pursue careers outside academia. Graduate advisors are by default academics and often unable to provide information about other career options. Learn about some of the careers available to aquatic PhD''s through first-hand accounts in this panel conversation.

Nutrient and Long-term Monitoring Workshop

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: C 120 - 122

Organized By: Nichole Halsey (nhalsey@seabird.com)

Join Hach Hydromet and Sea-Bird Coastal for a Free workshop on in situ nutrient monitoring technology and long term monitoring solutions for challenging environments! This workshop is the perfect opportunity to learn about this exciting technology as well as real life applications. The session will be led by two of our technical/scientific experts who will be available to answer all of your questions.

Large-Scale Cultivation of Microalgae with Commercial Potential: Products and Processes

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 6:00:00 PM
Location: B 113

Organized By: Schonna Manning (schonna.manning@utexas.edu)

This workshop is designed to introduce attendees to the principles of cultivating microalgae at production scale for biomass and diverse natural products, including fuels and specialty chemicals. Presentations will discuss the emergent properties of growing microalgae at increasingly larger volumes and the challenges of managing cultures for commercial applications. Instructors will include Drs. Jerry Brand (UTEX), Milton Sommerfeld (AzCATI), Thomas Dempster (AzCATI), and Schonna Manning (UTEX).

Tipping Points Town Hall

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014   Time: 6:00:00 PM
Location: A 106

Organized By: Carolyn Currin (carolyn.currin@noaa.gov)

This town hall will follow and expand upon some of the ideas from the plenary session 002: Tipping Points Science: From global theories to local tools and session 083: Restoration of European wetlands: thresholds and tipping points and integrate them around climate impacts. We will explore how the themes introduced in these sessions could improve efforts to detect impacts of climate change on coastal ecosystems and provide information and tools for the management of changing aquatic ecosystems.

The USDA Conservation Effects and Assessment Project (CEAP) – Wetlands (invitation only)

Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014   Time: 8:00:00 AM
Location: D 130

The goal of the Wetlands Component of the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) National Assessment is to develop a broad collaborative foundation that facilitates the production and delivery of scientific data, results, and information related to effects of conservation programs and practices on the provisioning of ecosystem services valued by society. This meeting brings together researchers from several CEAP-Wetlands Regional Assessment Teams to discuss project progress and set future directions and timelines. Organized by David Mushet. This meeting is by invitation only

SWS PCP Ethics Workshop #2

Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 109

Organized By: Dhru Bhatt (dbhatt@association-resources.com)

Receive training on the ethical dilemmas that Professional Wetland Scientists, Consultants and Regulators face during this two-day training session held on Tuesday, May 20 and Wednesday, May 21 from 12:15 – 1:15pm. This workshop is open to all JASM registrants and includes lunch. Pre-registration required.

Status, updates, and remaining questions in the STREON experimental program

Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 105

Organized By: Jen Degrossa (jdegrossa@neoninc.org)

The STReams Experimental Observatory Network (STREON) is a continent-spanning, open-access experimental initiative that will be executed by the National Ecological Observatory Network. STREON will manipulate nutrient concentrations and the presence/absence of large-bodied consumers in ten NEON wadable streams across North America,from the Arctic to Puerto Rico.

Waters of U.S. Workshop/Technical Workshop on Freshwater Landscape (Invitation Only)

Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014   Time: 1:00:00 PM
Location: D 130

Organized By: Kristin Parry (Kristen.Parry@tetratech.com)

Waters of U.S. Workshop/Technical Workshop on Freshwater Landscape Invitation Only

Isolated Wetlands Research Group

Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014   Time: 6:00:00 PM
Location: A 107 - 108

Organized By: Heather Golden (golden.heather@epa.gov)

This workgroup is a continuation from a recent workshop and established research collaborative on the science, function, and connectivity of isolated wetlands. Research scientists from across North America will meet to focus on manuscripts and project proposal development.

Introductory Environmental, Ocean & Aquatic Science Workshop

Date: Thursday, May 22, 2014   Time: 12:15:00 PM
Location: A 105

Organized By: Bob Chen, University of Massachusetts

This workshop will be led by Bob Chen, University of Massachusetts, Boston. Introductory environmental, ocean, and aquatic science courses provide an excellent opportunity to prepare majors and non-majors for thinking about some of the largest issues facing society such as climate change and energy needs. Large courses can also serve to attract students into the field. This workshop will provide some strategies to overcome some of the challenges of teaching large courses while making your teaching engaging, relevant, and effective. Open to all attendees.

Schedule subject to change.