Program & Agenda

Workshops and Town Halls

Listed in chronological order.

Coral Identification Capacity Building Program - Coral Identification Workshop - Day 1 of 2

Date: Saturday, 18 June 2016   Time: 08:30 - 16:30
Location: Off-Site Location

The Coral Identification Capacity Building Program will be running a two-day lab based coral identification workshop at WAIKIKI AQUARIUM
Honolulu, Hawaii, USA , Sat. June 18 - Sun. June 19, 2016.

Details of the workshop are including below.

A download link to the flyer and the option to book a place can be found at: http://www.byoguides.com/shop/.

Please address inquiries to: russell@byoguides.com.  

The workshop will run at the Waikiki Aquarium, Honolulu, Hawaii. The program is based around the Coral Finder Toolkit, a suite of proven, practical resources for coral identification. The Coral Finder uses a visual approach that makes it possible for beginners to advance rapidly with little prior knowledge. Led by Russell Kelley (author of the Coral Finder and the Reef Finder) the workshop uses audio-visual and hands-on training, tutorials and instruction. The workshop includes a take home Coral Finder Toolkit: including the completely revised Coral Finder 3.0 and complete audiovisual training on a USB flash drive.

Participants learn how to use the Coral Finder to identify corals to genus, regardless of growth form, and how to cross reference field results back to formal knowledge for species ID. Special emphasis is placed on techniques for field identification, self directed learning and problem solving. For non-coral specialists, the workshop rapidly develops basic coral identification skills. For current or future coral specialists, the workshop improves the reliability and consistency of coral identification and develops a mature understanding of how to approach species identification. The training applies equally topside or underwater. Even people with extensive prior knowledge of corals benefit significantly from the problem solving training built into the Coral Finder workshop. The workshop also summaries the changes and implications of new molecular taxonomy findings while providing an easy-to-grasp, practical, field focused approach to coral identification.

WHERE / WHEN: Waikiki Aquarium 8.30am->4.30pm, Saturday June, 18 -> Sun. June 19, 2016 COST: Australian $240.00

INCLUDES: 2 full days of lab tuition; take home training materials including the Coral Finder Toolkit 3.0: (the revised Coral Finder 3.0 paper edition, magnifier and a complete set of training movies / revision movies / resources. (Normally $AU80). Note: Morning and afternoon tea provided. Lunch and snacks can be purchased from locally. Does not include accommodation.

Developing a Reef Resilience Framework

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: 302 A/B

THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY WORKSHOP. The Great Barrier Reef Foundation is convening a global think tank to develop a Reef Resilience Framework, which will operationalise resilience. The framework will be a mechanism to drive action toward reef resilience and resilience planning, and will be internationally applicable and scalable. Essentially, the Framework will be a roadmap for how a hierarchy of management solutions, sound understanding, decision support tools, and monitoring, evaluation and reporting contribute towards achieving the vision of enhancing Reef resilience. This workshop will convene a think tank of resilience practitioners to contribute towards Framework development, and share experiences and lessons learned globally.

For more information about this event, contact Melissa Rodgers, Great Barrier Reef Foundation, Mrodgers@barrierreef.org.

Raine Island Restoration Workshop

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: 303 A/B

THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY WORKSHOP. The Raine Island Restoration Project aims to restore and maintain Raine Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) as a viable island ecosystem, which facilitates green turtle breeding, and seabird nesting and feeding, to support sustainable populations of those species and other depending species. Research and monitoring over the last 30 years clearly shows that the northern GBR green turtle stock is in the early stage of decline, and that Raine Island has been failing as a turtle rookery since the late 1990’s. This is significant, as 90% of the GBR green turtles nest here. The major issues include very low nesting success, reductions in the number of clutches laid, hatchling failure, and adult female mortality. A pilot project trialling artificial barriers indicated that turtle mortality can be reduced. Sand redistribution was also trialed, and resulted in a more even nesting distribution, which increased hatching results. This project will undertake further works over 5 years to restore nesting success or indicate additional and alternative strategies required to restore the Raine Island nesting site, in conjunction with ongoing monitoring and research to assess its success and record population status. This workshop will be a knowledge sharing think tank to discuss restoration experiences and lessons learned from a range of global practitioners. This project is a collaboration between the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the Queensland Government, and BPH Billiton.

For more information about this event, contact Melissa Rodgers, Great Barrier Reef Foundation, Mrodgers@barrierreef.org.

Getting Published

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: 307 A/B

Announcement for a one-day workshop on “Getting Published”. In conjunction with the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium Symposium, the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies will host a one-day workshop on ‘Getting Published’ on June 19, 2016. This workshop will be directed at early career scientists interested in learning how to navigate the publication process. The workshop will be run by Professors Joshua Cinner and Terry Hughes. Josh and Terry have each published over 100 peer reviewed papers in journals such as Current Biology, Nature, Nature Climate Change, PNAS, and Science. They have served on the Editorial Boards of journals such as Coral Reefs, Conservation Biology, Global Environmental Change, Ecology & Society, and Coastal Management. Profs Cinner and Hughes will use their considerable editorial, publishing, and reviewing experience to provide insights into how to structure manuscripts effectively, navigate the peer-review process, and on how to build a portfolio of publications from early in your career. The workshop will be suitable for early career researchers, ranging from graduate students working on their first publication to postdoctoral researchers within a few years of their PhD.

The workshop will use five manuscripts from the participants as living examples of what to do and what not to do. Thus, participants who are interested in having their work openly critiqued should indicate so in their application. We will select five participants to submit manuscripts that will serve as examples for the section of the workshop focusing on structuring a manuscript effectively. However, you need not have a manuscript prepared to attend the workshop.

How to apply. This workshop is open only to those who will be attending the Symposium and registration will be on a first come first serve basis. Applicants to the workshop should submit their application letters and CVs to cindy.huchery@jcu.edu.au by May 15 2016. In your letter, indicate if you wish to submit a manuscript in preparation for evaluation during the workshop. Based on responses to the pre-workshop survey, we will select five people to submit manuscripts. Please do not submit a manuscript unless you are requested to do so.

Networking: Making the Most of Being at ICRS

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: 313 C

INVITATION ONLY. This workshop is for Australian graduate students and early career researchers attending the ICRS 2016. The program will focus on networking and international links and on developing necessary skills to successfully deal with media and journalists.

For more information about this event, contact Jenny Lappin, ARC Center of Excellence, Coral Reef Studies JCU, jennifer.lappin@jcu.edu.au.

Cyber Tools and Resources for Coral Reef Research and Analysis - CRESCYNT.org Workshop

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: 314

Two data workshop sessions will be held. The morning session will focus on preparing legacy data and images for storage, discovery, and retrieval, including access to free data storage sites and developing metadata. The afternoon session will focus on more cutting edge techniques for image analysis, data analysis, and cyberinfrastructure readiness.

For more information about this event, contact Ouida Meier, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, UH Manoa, omeier@hawaii.edu.

Field Identification of Coral Disease

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: 308 A/B

Coral disease is an increasing problem for reefs worldwide. The critical first step in understanding the ecological significance of coral disease is to conduct baseline field surveys of disease prevalence and establish a longer-term monitoring program. However, many scientists and resource managers trained in reef monitoring lack sufficient background in the identification and description of coral diseases. This workshop is designed to familiarize field biologists with in situ identification of common coral diseases and present current methods for investigating coral disease ecology. Approaches to disease management will also be discussed. The workshop will consist of a lecture component to share information and a field component, where participants will get hands-on training in coral lesion identification and description. The field component will be conducted on snorkel, and participants will be expected to provide their own mask, fins and snorkel. A small fee will be at the beginning of the session to cover transportation to the field site and lunch.

Please address inquiries to Greta Aeby, greta@hawaii.edu.

Coral Disease Investigations

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:00 - 18:00
Location: Off-Site Location

Since coral diseases were first reported in the 1970s, protocols have been developed and applied to identify diverse pathogens and understand their effects on the organisms. This workshop will focus on histopathological examination of coral cells and tissues, which is the diagnostic tool that should be used in every study. We will present principles of wildlife disease investigations, how to describe gross lesions, field sampling methods, and basic gross and microscopic anatomy of corals. Participants will read histoslides from normal and diseased corals using light microscopes and learn how to use NOAA’s Coral Virtual Microscopy slide collection for online study. Histotechniques will be discussed during the lunch break.

This event will be held at Windward Community College. Transportation will be provided, to confirm your participation please notify Mike Sweet at M.Sweet@derby.ac.uk, participants should bring their own lunch and drinks.

Coral Identification Capacity Building Program - Coral Identification Workshop - Day 2 of 2

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 08:30 - 16:30
Location: Off-Site Location

The Coral Identification Capacity Building Program will be running a two-day lab based coral identification workshop at WAIKIKI AQUARIUM
Honolulu, Hawaii, USA , Sat. June 18 - Sun. June 19, 2016.

Details of the workshop are including below.

A download link to the flyer and the option to book a place can be found at: http://www.byoguides.com/shop/.

Please address inquiries to: russell@byoguides.com.  

The workshop will run at the Waikiki Aquarium, Honolulu, Hawaii. The program is based around the Coral Finder Toolkit, a suite of proven, practical resources for coral identification. The Coral Finder uses a visual approach that makes it possible for beginners to advance rapidly with little prior knowledge. Led by Russell Kelley (author of the Coral Finder and the Reef Finder) the workshop uses audio-visual and hands-on training, tutorials and instruction. The workshop includes a take home Coral Finder Toolkit: including the completely revised Coral Finder 3.0 and complete audiovisual training on a USB flash drive.

Participants learn how to use the Coral Finder to identify corals to genus, regardless of growth form, and how to cross reference field results back to formal knowledge for species ID. Special emphasis is placed on techniques for field identification, self directed learning and problem solving. For non-coral specialists, the workshop rapidly develops basic coral identification skills. For current or future coral specialists, the workshop improves the reliability and consistency of coral identification and develops a mature understanding of how to approach species identification. The training applies equally topside or underwater. Even people with extensive prior knowledge of corals benefit significantly from the problem solving training built into the Coral Finder workshop. The workshop also summaries the changes and implications of new molecular taxonomy findings while providing an easy-to-grasp, practical, field focused approach to coral identification.

WHERE / WHEN: Waikiki Aquarium 8.30am->4.30pm, Saturday June, 18 -> Sun. June 19, 2016 COST: Australian $240.00

INCLUDES: 2 full days of lab tuition; take home training materials including the Coral Finder Toolkit 3.0: (the revised Coral Finder 3.0 paper edition, magnifier and a complete set of training movies / revision movies / resources. (Normally $AU80). Note: Morning and afternoon tea provided. Lunch and snacks can be purchased from locally. Does not include accommodation.

Coral Triangle Strategy Consultation Workshop

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 09:30 - 16:30
Location: 306 A/B

THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY MEETING. We are holding a consultation workshop for comment on a draft Coral Triangle (CT) strategy document, which will feed into the European Commission’s process to develop their “strategic approach to biodiversity conservation” in Asia. WCS is coordinating overall; in this meeting we will present a draft marine report highlighting ongoing conservation efforts in the CT region and opportunities to build on successes and lessons learned, based on key documents and expert interviews. This consultation workshop will be important in order to make sure CT government and partner organizations’ views are properly incorporated into the report. As we recommend promising approaches moving forward, the intention of the report is to consult broadly with the conservation community experts and key government and non-government organizations.

For more information about this event or the EC process, contact Helen Fox on behalf of the Wildlife Conservation Society, foxconservation@gmail.com.

Combating IUU Fishing Nearshore: the opportunities of emerging technology and its limits

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 09:30 - 12:00
Location: 311

Efforts to combat illegal, unregulated, and unreported (IUU) fishing are gaining momentum globally with both the U.S. and Europe currently implementing major initiatives to eliminate illegal fishing. These efforts often focus on traceability systems, vessel monitoring efforts, and the implementation of the Port State Measures Agreement that target larger vessels engaged in IUU. There is a critical need to identify, pilot, and scale-up technologies, patrolling approaches, and institutional arrangements that are appropriate for near-shore fisheries, where most of the boats are engaged in small scale fisheries. These areas are often plagued by unreported catches that compromise local management efforts, as well as illegal encroachment by larger vessels that damage coral reef habitats and stocks. This workshop will draw on recent experiences from Africa, Southeast Asia and Central and South America - to consider how emerging technologies can help address illegal and unregulated fishing in near-shore waters, and what broader social and institutional arrangements are needed to enable their success.

For more information about this event, contact Heidi Schuttenberg, U.S. Agency for International Development, hschuttenberg@usaid.gov.

Seagrass futures in the tropical Indo-Pacific

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 13:00 - 17:00
Location: 313 B

Coral reef and seagrass ecosystems adopt a mutualistic relationship in which the structural integrity of the reef provides habitat for reef top and lagoonal seagrass meadows that, in turn, deliver vital nursery grounds and multi-level trophic inputs to support a more resilient reef system. Climate change-driven threats to coral reefs and the human populations they support are well established. However, impacts on reef-associated seagrass communities and the human dimension associated with such loss have been inadequately addressed. Indo-Pacific island nations are under pressure to find solutions to cope with this imminent change. Our goal is to engage ICRS attendees, particularly those working in this region, to identify effective and applied science solutions in Pacific Island communities facing climate-scale issues that will impact their relationship with seagrass communities. The workshop will promote cross-communication between coral, fisheries and seagrass scientists working on threats such as sea-level rise, ocean acidification, and the human costs of these problems. Evidence of a successful workshop will be 1) identifying gaps in knowledge and research programs, 2) exploring opportunities for research with other reef scientists, 3) designing a “boots-on-the-ground” approach to the needs of Pacific Island nations, 4) establishing effective and meaningful partnerships with a plan to engage participants post-ICRS, and 5) producing a manuscript summarising our findings.

For more information about this event, contact: Katie Chartrand, James Cook University, Katie.Chartrand@jcu.edu.au.

A conversation on ecosystem-based management of Hawaiian reefs

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 13:00 - 17:00
Location: 313 A

The Ocean Tipping Points project, a collaboration led by U. Hawaii and UC Santa Barbara, invites representatives of local managers, NGO's, stakeholders and scientists to gather for a discussion of the immediate and long-term science needs for catalyzing holistic management of Hawaii's reefs. Our ultimate goals are to foster collaboration between scientists and the broader community, and identify priority research topics and upcoming engagement opportunities. Topics will be tailored to the attendees' interests, and may include: - latest science of ecosystem "tipping points" - decision support tools for managing land-based pollution, - managing cumulative human impacts, - metrics of reef resilience, - place-based conservation strategies, - ecosystem service valuation - science needs for reef restoration - data sharing and open-access science - science communication and stakeholder outreach. Scientists working on the topics above will be on hand to give speed-talks on their latest research and discuss future directions. Open discussion will follow. This is intended to be a chance for sharing ideas about filling knowledge gaps, improving data integration, brainstorming strategies for both the science and communication of ecosystem-based management, and supporting communities to improve local reef management. Please contact Kim Selkoe to RSVP or to ask questions selkoe@nceas.ucsb.eduselkoe@nceas.ucsb.edu) and visit: http://www.oceantippingpoints.org to find out more about this project.

Coral Reef Conservation through Transformational Education

Date: Sunday, 19 June 2016   Time: 13:00 - 17:00
Location: 312

We in Hawaii have created coral reef conservation success stories through diverse, widely-targeted transformational educational efforts facilitated by almost every kind of entity concerned with conservation and education. Collectively, we have much to share with the conservation community, and we can demonstrate how, when we all work together, we can have a significant positive impact. Our session is designed to serve diverse stakeholders all interested in coral reef conservation education that leads to change. Our session goals are to share our tools and methodologies for transformational conservation education in an interactive way. Our facilitator has assisted people from around the world in active-learning beyond the formal learning environment. We will highlight programs in which traditional knowledge from Hawaii and the Pacific Islands and western science have worked well together. We will share our collective wisdom for overcoming obstacles. The reef, like many ecosystems, is not always an easy place to take learners to, so we will share our techniques for circumventing this challenge and bringing the place to people, as well as our methods for getting the people into the place safely. We aim to develop new connections and commitments in our own backyard while also catalyzing the formation or strengthening of networks in other regions. We would love to help the ICRS develop further world-wide transformational conservation education networks and activities.

For more information about this event, contact Gail Grabowsky, Chaminade University, ggrabows@chaminade.edu.

CoralCollab.net Beta: A collaborative and open source platform for managing and analyzing data

Date: Monday, 20 June 2016   Time: 12:00 - 13:15
Location: 305 A/B

Come learn about and interact with http://www.CoralCollab.net, a new collaborative and open source application that will allow users to store, manage, analyze, and visualize coral reef ecological monitoring data. In the face of global threats to coral reefs, there is an urgent need to scale up local data to address global research questions. While tens of millions of dollars are invested in coral reef monitoring, conservation, and management, this information remains largely disparate in separate organizations and on computers of individual researchers. The Coral Collaboration online database allows scientists, managers, and organizations to aggregate and share coral reef data within organizations and among networks of researchers. CoralCollab.net integrates coral reef science with the latest open source technology standards to facilitate scientific analysis and actionable science. In this interactive workshop, we will demonstrate the core functions of CoralCollab.net, including streamlined data entry, quality control mechanisms, data storage and management, setting the level of data privacy for your own projects, and built-in and customizable data analyses and visualizations. We also seek feedback to guide further development of the database and protocols: what functions are most important for your research and management needs? CoralCollab.net is designed to serve the scientific and management communities, so come see how it can work for your data management and analysis needs.

For more information about this event, contact Jill Harris, WWF, jill.harris@wwfus.org.

Corals of the World

Date: Monday, 20 June 2016   Time: 12:00 - 13:15
Location: Kalakaua Ballroom A/B/C

Fifteen years have now passed since the three volume book, Corals of the World was published. During this time there has been extensive new fieldwork, the Coral Triangle has been delineated, and molecular studies have proliferated. The building of an open access website of the same name was started soon after the book was published has now reached the point of initial public release: http://www.coralsoftheworld.com.

The website has the many interlinked components. These include: (1) Summary pages of the 840+ species considered by the authors to be valid. These pages contain basic information, extensive photography and taxonomic overviews. (2) An electronic name finder accessing over 2000 names including synonyms together with relevant literature. (3) Coral Geographic which generates maps according to user needs, including complex ones. Data supporting species distributions are very extensive and basic statistical information accompanies maps. (4) Coral ID, the identification tool is under development (5) Coral Enquirer, an endpoint for assessing the vulnerability of species, is also under development and will be open for discussion. This will not be a regular session. It is intended to be for questions, answers, contributions and ideas for future development. Please bring photographs of corals if you are happy for us to use them.

For more information about this event, contact Charlie Veron, j.veron@coralreefresearch.com.

Coral disease across the Indo-Pacific: threats and management

Date: Monday, 20 June 2016   Time: 19:00 - 20:00
Location: 301 B

Coral disease has emerged as a problem on reefs across the Indo-Pacific. Recent research has uncovered much information on the ecology of many of the diseases, factors that increase disease prevalence and strategies for disease management. This talk will be designed for the general public to familiarize them with basics of understanding coral diseases and why they have become a current management problem for coral reefs. It will also use regional examples to illustrate local stressors that underlie disease problems and management actions being taken to address the growing threat.

For more information about this event, contact Greta Aeby, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, greta@hawaii.edu.

Using Chlorophyll fluorescence to measure coral photophysiology

Date: Monday, 20 June 2016   Time: 19:00 - 21:00
Location: 302 A/B

Chlorophyll fluorescence PAM-style measurements have been widely used to address coral physiological status. While the technique has the potential for wide application, many anecdotal accounts and even published papers indicate some users are not getting the most from their fluorometers. This workshop seeks to redress this by outlining fundamental principles of chlorophyll fluorescence, with an emphasis on setting up commonly used instruments for lab and field based studies. Experimental design will be discussed, with case studies from participants used to illustrate important principles. Attendees should leave the workshop with confidence in designing and executing robust photosynthesis experiments with corals and coral systems.

For more information about this event, contact John Runcie, Aquation Pty Ltd, john.runcie@aquation.com.au.

The Science and Management of Water Quality on Coral Reefs

Date: Monday, 20 June 2016   Time: 19:00 - 21:00
Location: 308 A/B

The US Coral Reef Task Force and its member organizations have identified water quality as a key factor that impacts coral reef health. There is currently a gap between the management community conducting the monitoring, and the science that identifies key constituents and quantities that cause impacts.

This workshop will be an opportunity for experts to assist Task Force member agencies with efforts at revising and updating monitoring to support resource management. Key types of questions for discussion would be: 1) Rather than the standard suite of nutrients, sediment, and other water quality parameters, is there a condensed set of parameters that are best for monitoring for coral reefs? 2) What are the key constituents that are impacting coral reefs, and what are the trigger levels for managers to be aware of? 3) Are there ways to adequately estimate when resources are approaching those trigger levels of concern? 4) Modeling is often proposed as a means to obtain estimated trigger levels, however they have not been at a scale to sufficiently calibrate or ground-truth, and thus not useful for direct management. Are there new/better models that can achieve this? 5) Are there more effective ways to find out information about impacts to coral other than from water quality monitoring, i.e. satellite imagery monitoring, or tissue sample collection from marine species, etc?

For more information about this event, contact Dana Okano, NOAA CRCP, dana.okano@noaa.gov.

Using genomics for coral reef management – a needs assessment

Date: Tuesday, 21 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 302 A/B

A promising approach to integrating science, policy, and practice effectively is to connect more directly those who are producing scientific tools and those who are using them. This side event will address practical options for making science more useful for coral reef restoration and management, using the topic of emerging molecular technologies such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

We intend to have an interactive session focused on matching tools with potential users. First, managers and scientists will describe existing case studies of the use of molecular techniques for coral reef management in the field. Second, scientists and law enforcement officials will discuss the current or proposed use of molecular techniques for finding and addressing sources of coral damage. We will then moderate a discussion among managers, decision-makers, law enforcement officials, and researchers about other possibilities for using genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics for coral reef management. We intend to recruit a diverse set of discussion participants among the ICRS attendees.

We hope that by promoting a high level of interaction among participants, the session can help identify promising new uses for molecular techniques and foster partnerships among those working on coral reef management, and link directly to the ICRS 2016 theme of “Bridging science to policy.”

For more information about this event, contact Angela Bednarek, The Pew Charitable Trusts, abednarek@pewtrusts.org.

ISRS Town Hall Meeting: Climate Change & Coral Bleaching

Date: Tuesday, 21 June 2016   Time: 19:00 - 21:00
Location: 310 Theater

This meeting is organised by ISRS and supporting organisations to discuss the current dire threat of climate change and coral bleaching to reef ecosystems. What should the reef science and management community do to alert both decision makers and the general public to the seriousness of this threat? The meeting is open to both ISRS members and non-members.

For more information about this event, contact Rupert Ormond, ISRS, rupert.ormond.mci@gmail.com.

Action Network for Coral Health and Resilience Working Group

Date: Tuesday, 21 June 2016   Time: 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 306 A/B

THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY WORKSHOP. ANCH&R was developed to 1) Facilitate communication among in-country scientists, managers, and coral disease experts, 2) Build and support in-county capacity for baseline disease surveys and disease outbreak response, and 3) Improve our understanding of the causes and consequences of disease to enable reef managers to assess and manage disease risk. During this working group meeting, ANCH&R partners will discuss projects that address these three goals. We will also discuss other topics such as: large funding opportunities to expand ANCH&R, membership, future meetings, ANCH&R coordination and communication.

For more information about this event, contact Courtney Couch, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, courtneycouch@gmail.com.

Hawaii Marine Enforcement Conference II

Date: Tuesday, 21 June 2016   Time: 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 303 A/B

The William S. Richardson School of Law will be hosting the second Hawaii Marine Enforcement Conference (HMREC II) in June 2016. This conference brings together partners in nearshore marine enforcement, such as the Hawaii State Department of Land & Natural Resources, NOAA, Coast Guard, county police/sheriffs, fishers, the judiciary, prosecutors, public defenders, legal practitioners, scientists, and citizens groups. The goal of the conference is to improve collaboration across entities and interest groups, and to enhance the strategic and consistent enforcement of state marine protection laws and regulations.

For more information about this event, contact Denise Antilini, William S. Richardson School of Law, antolini@hawaii.edu.

Marine Habitat & Ecosystem Threats of Personal Care Products

Date: Tuesday, 21 June 2016   Time: 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 307 A/B

The International Programme on the State of the Ocean, IUCN and World Parks Congress will present the findings of a scientific workshop held in the Spring of 2016 which examines the threats posed to marine habitats and ecosystems from pollution originating in domestically used personal care products (PCPs). The scientists will review the existing literature and consider the state of the ocean in regards to PCP pollution. The workshop held during the Coral Symposium will gather a broader group of scientists and experts to consider these scientific findings and develop recommendations arising from them with a view to helping to inform policy and other measures.

For more information about this event, contact Mirella Von Lindenfels, Communications Inc., mirella@communicationsinc.co.uk.

USGS Town Hall

Date: Wednesday, 22 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 301 B

THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY MEETING. U.S. Geological Survey scientists will gather to discuss opportunities for collaboration, program growth, and new initiatives to meet the science needs of our partners.

For more information about this event, contact Ilsa Kuffner, U.S. Geological Survey, ikuffner@usgs.gov.

Experiences and Best Practices with Citizen Science Activities

Date: Wednesday, 22 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 305 A/B

In connection with Session 88: "Citizen Science in Support for Coral Reef Protection and Sustainability", we invite meeting attendees to a special town hall forum to share their experiences as an organizer, scientist, and/or participant in citizen science activities and to learn from each other. Along with our formal paper and poster sessions, this open dialog will help to identify challenges and opportunities, levels of engagement, lessons learned and best practices for the role of citizen science in coral reef conservation. We seek to address questions such as: What practices help/hinder success and why? Did experiences meet expectations by all involved? What roles are citizen scientists asked to carry out? How do we attract, engage, and follow up with participants? Do we ask too much/little of citizen scientists? How are citizen science contributions measured? Can citizen science activities be standardized to address broader global-scale issues? Who is an ideal citizen scientist? By addressing these and other questions, we can begin to refine the scope, role and utility of citizen science approaches to coral reef conservation.

For more information about this event, visit http://www.greatbarrierreefcitizenscience.org.au/icrs-2016/ or contact Karsten Shein, NOAA, Karsten.Shein@noaa.gov.

A Sea of Glass

Date: Wednesday, 22 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 306 A/B

A showing of the 30 minute film, Fragile Legacy (Ted Danson narrated) and introduction to the Blaschka Biodiversity project, which aims to use art to inspire appreciation of the invertebrate biodiversity in our oceans. The father-son glassmaking team of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka created a glass menagerie of over 800 marine invertebrate models 150 years ago. The Blaschkas were captivated by sea anemones, soft corals, nudibranchs, octopus and squid and spun their likenesses into exquisite glass replicas, documenting life in oceans untouched by climate change and human impacts. Inspired by the Blaschkas’ uncanny replicas, Harvell, who curates Cornell’s glass model collection, set out in search of their living counterparts. In the film Fragile Legacy and the just-released book A Sea of Glass, we describe our quest to find what living representatives remain of the Blaschka’s subjects. This is a conservation project, revealing the surprising and unusual biology of some of the most ancient animals on the tree of life. It is a way to communicate a century of change in our ocean ecosystems and learn which of the living matches for the Blaschkas’ creations are, indeed, as fragile as glass.

The documentary Fragile Legacy, won the Best Short Film award at the 2015 Blue Ocean Film Festival & Conservation Summit. Click Here to view the trailer of the film.

See Cornell’s Blaschka collection in person at the Corning Museum of Glass beginning in May 2016. Click Here for more information.

For more information about this event, contact Drew Harvell, Cornell University, cdh5@cornell.edu.

Global reef reporting – from science to policy. The roles of ICRS/ISRS, IUCN, GCRMN and others / Bridging the gap: science and conservation

Date: Wednesday, 22 June 2016   Time: 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 301 B

This event will identify how the scientific community (ISRS/ICRS) can contribute more formally in global science-policy processes through a) building on GCRMN to develop a mature global observation network, b) identifying and producing Essential Biodiversity/Ocean Variables that will enable comprehensive reporting on coral reef state and trends, and c) linking these to conservation decision-support tools (e.g. IUCN Red List of Species/Ecosystems, Red List Index, Key Biodiversity Areas) for greater impact.

The session will provide for debate among participants on key themes, building on findings from other ICRS sessions (In particular GCRMN, the current bleaching event, etc). Prior to the session, a survey will be circulated to ISRS members and ICRS attendees, and preparation materials will be provided. The format will include a 30-minute panel outlining the potential roles of multiple programs followed by 45 minutes for working groups using rapid/social lab tools. Topics will be determined from survey results, and priority issues identified in building up to the ICRS. Groups will present 5 key messages to the plenary, to be compiled into a short-list of key messages from the Town Hall meeting, and submit more detailed notes for inclusion in a session report that will contribute to a GEOBON Open Science session (July) and the IUCN Congress (Sept, in Hawai’i), and thereafter, a 2017-2020 workplan to deliver global reporting on coral reefs (Aichi Target 10) and SDG14 (Oceans).

Given both the time conflict and the strong thematic overlap “Bridging the gap: science and conservation” is joining “Global reef reporting – from science to policy. The roles of ICRS/ISRS, IUCN, GCRMN and others.” We welcome individuals who are interested in navigating the interface of coral reef conservation and science, and communicating across that boundary, to join. As part of this session, break-out groups will brainstorm ways to better link solution-oriented science to conservation and management needs, including next steps for “Developing a scientific evidence base for the success of management interventions on coral reefs,” which could potentially inform the Conservation Evidence project http://www.conservationevidence.com.

http://www.conservationevidence.com.

For more information about “Global reef reporting" contact David Obura,dobura@cordioea.net.

For more information on a scientific evidence base for reef conservation, contact Sue Wells, suewells1212@gmail.com or Helen Fox, fox.conservation@gmail.com.

Global challenges and perspectives in mesophotic biodiversity research.

Date: Wednesday, 22 June 2016   Time: 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 302 A/B

THIS IS AN INVITATION ONLY WORKSHOP. In the recent years, Mesophotic Coral Ecosystem research gained momentum rapidly. Numerous studies using the latest available technologies have been performed on mesophotic corals and their associated fauna. However, most of these studies were restricted to specific locations and there is only very little information available to draw generalizations and understand the global ecology of the mesophotic zone in tropical and subtropical waters. Knowledge on the biodiversity and distribution of mesophotic organisms are particularly important bottlenecks in MCE research. This meeting aims to provide a platform to discuss these issues in a more in-depth manner than possible in the tight schedule of a formal session. With a smaller attendance than at the formal session, this meeting will also provide a timely and appropriate opportunity to discuss topics which would not find their place in the formal session.

For more information about this event, contact Frederic Sinniger, University of the Ryukyus, fredsinniger@hotmail.com.

Epigenetic research in coral reefs

Date: Thursday, 23 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 302 A/B

The premise of epigenetic modification in corals as a potential adaptation response has generated a surge of ongoing research. In order to coordinate current research efforts and determine the current state of the field, we invite scientists to this workshop, who conduct, plan or are interested in epigenetic investigations on corals (and other reef organisms.

To understand the complexity and functionality of epigenetic modifications, for example, (i) when and how which modifications occur, (ii) what role they play in organism function and (iii) when and how they are transferred to the next generation, will be a great challenge for researchers in the coming years. Different complementary research approaches are needed to tackle these questions, using spatio-temporal in situ investigations, controlled ex situ experiments and an array of analytical tools, such as different epigenetic analyses (DNA methylation, histone variants, micro RNA), transcriptomic and proteomic analyses and investigations of diverse ‘fitness parameters’ (growth, reproduction success, immunity, etc.). Only combined, these efforts are able to provide a holistic view on the potential role of epigenetic modifications for coral adaptation in a changing world, which may alter our future predictions for coral reefs substantially, and our strategies to manage coral reefs efficiently. Please indicate your attendance in advance by contacting the organizers.

For more information about this event, contact Yvonne Sawall, GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, ysawall@geomar.de.

A Town Hall: Future Impacts of Personal Care Product Pollution to Coral Reefs

Date: Thursday, 23 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 303 A/B

The International Programme on the State of the Ocean, IUCN and World Parks Congress will present the findings of a scientific workshop held in the Spring of 2016 and in June 2016 in Honolulu of threats posed to marine habitats and ecosystems from pollution originating in domestically used personal care products (PCPs), the possible implications for future marine science field investigation, policy recommendations to decision makers, and approaches to communications to the general public.

For more information about this event, contact Mirella Von Lindenfels, Communications Inc., mirella@communicationsinc.co.uk.

From Coral Reefs to Capitol Hill: Building bridges between scientists and policy makers for effective coral ecosystem management and conservation.

Date: Thursday, 23 June 2016   Time: 11:30 - 12:45
Location: 306 A/B

Increased communication between scientists and policy makers is necessary to effectively manage and sustain coral reef ecosystems. Policy makers need the best available science to inform, develop, and initiate effective policies and legislation directed at ocean conservation and management. But where do they obtain their scientific information from and how is it used to inform the decision making process?

Scientists are the best primary source for interpreting the practical implications of their research, but may find it difficult to navigate the legislative process, establish communication with policy makers, or determine how to best present their science in a way that's understandable and useful. Non-profit organizations often serve as intermediaries, spanning the divide between scientists and decision makers and facilitating the translation of science into effective policy. This session will focus on ways to build capacity amongst scientists and policy makers through informative presentations and discussions. A panel of experts will demystify how science is sourced and used by non-profit organizations, policy makers, and in the U.S. Congress and how scientists can actively inform policy by providing scientific information to decision makers. A discussion aimed at identifying the needs of each stakeholder group will follow.

Presenters for this session will include:

  • Rupert Ormond, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, rupert.ormond.mci@gmail.com, FROM CAMPFIRE TO CONFERENCE CHAMBER: TACTICS FOR SECURING CONSERVATION LEGISLATION;
  • Brett Hartl, Center for Biological Diversity, bhartl@biologicaldiversity.org, LEVERAGING UNDER-UTILIZED ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS TO ADVANCE CORAL CONSERVATION IN THE UNITED STATES;
  • Jennifer Salerno, George Mason University,jsalerno@gmu.edu, FROM THE IVORY TOWER TO THE HALLS OF CONGRESS: HOW SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION IS SOURCED AND USED IN THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS;
  • Arthur O. Tuda, Kenya Wildlife Service, tudahke@yahoo.com, UNDERSTANDING THE USE OF SCIENCE IN MARINE PROTECTED AREA DECISION MAKING IN THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN;
  • Karen McLeod, COMPASS, karen.mcleod@compassonline.org, A COMPASS TO HELP SCIENTISTS TO NAVIGATE THE SCIENCE-POLICY DIVIDE;
  • Susan White, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, susan_white@fws.gov, DISCOVER, INSPIRE AND CONSERVE THE UNITED STATES PACIFIC MARINE NATIONAL MONUMENTS
  • Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument: Past knowledge, present studies and future opportunities

    Date: Friday, 24 June 2016   Time: 13:45 - 15:45
    Location: 311

    This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It contains a diversity of habitats, including islands, coral reefs, submerged banks and seamounts, and an associated rich flora and fauna of bio-cultural significance and value. It is an area notable for an abundance of apex predators, sea birds, monk seals, corals and fishes, with a high degree of endemism. This session will focus on the past decade of research, the most recent discoveries and the potential for expansion from the present 50 mile boundary to the full 200 mile limit of the EEZ, which would make this the world’s largest MPA. The presenters will include natural and social scientists, cultural practitioners and historians and will be trans-disciplinary in nature.

    Roundtable: Coral Reef Restoration

    Date: Friday, 24 June 2016   Time: 18:30 - 20:30
    Location: 307 A/B

    BY INVITATION ONLY. This is a follow-up to sessions 42A, 42B and 43.

    For more information please contact Sarah Frias-Torres, Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History at Smithsonian Marine Station, sfriastorres@gmail.com or Tom Moore, NOAA Restoration Center, tom.moore@noaa.com.

    Schedule subject to change.